Intimate Partner Violence

Definition: Intimate Partner Violence [IPV]

“includes physical violence, sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression (including coercive tactics,) and control of reproductive or sexual health by a current or former intimate partner” (CDC, 2010-2012, p.117). This can include anyone current or past that you have had sexual relations.

Intimate partner violence might seem like a distant thought if you are in a loving and respectful relationship; however, what if your relationship or someone you love suddenly find themselves in an abusive relationship? How would you respond? Would you blame yourself for not being informed of the signs of violence? Today, you have chosen to read this blog for reasons only you know but reading it could save a life. Knowledge is power and even if you never have to deal with IPV it’s important to be informed.

IPV, according to the CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (2010-2012),  is estimated to have affected 44,981,000 women during their lifetime (CDC, 2010-2012). If your thinking this number is high, imagine if we combined decades of research from reported incidents of IPV. Intimate partner violence is a tragic epidemic that is affecting not only women, but men, youth, and even children in certain instances. IPV can have lifelong impacts on each person involved including but not limited to anxiety, depression, PTSD, homelessness, unintended pregnancy, substance abuse, high-risk sexual behavior, and or chronic pain syndromes (CDC, 2017). The aftermath of IPV can be hard to live with but it’s important that those who experience this trauma understand that they are not to blame for the actions of others. They are still worthy of love and respect. They should be encouraged to find their new identity outside of the abuse they experienced. Intimate partner violence can be prevented by educating yourself on the signs and symptoms of this abuse. Promoting positive healthy relationships is becoming more prominent as the years’ progress, but many women do not have access to the information that is being shared in America. Certain cultures, all over the world, have their own ideas about abuse and the rights of an individual. Think about how many people you see in a day. Are you providing a positive example of what a healthy relationship looks like or are you promoting IPV? Even a negative comment can turn someone off to your relationship, even if it’s behavior you and your partner engage in frequently. Encouraging one another and complimenting the positive attributes your partner is a great way to start leading others. This small step could change your relationship in ways you never imagined.

If you or someone you know is interested in more information on IPV or healthy relationships give us a call today 760-945-4673. If you or someone you know is suffering from abuse consider calling the National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7233.

References

CDC. ( 2010-2012) Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-StateReportBook.pdf

CDC. (2017). Intimate Partner Violence: Consequences. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/consequences.html