Casual Relationships

We all know about casual relationships. The Netflix and Chill epidemic has taken over and made an impact on society, including many of you reading this now. In 2018, we are very much in a culture that dictates fast-paced living. We want everything at our fingertips and working for anything seems like a distant memory of the past. As easy as it is to find a partner to hook up with, you have to wonder if the ‘hook up’ culture as easy as it seems? Is it really easier sleeping with those whom you have ‘no strings attached’ or is there more to it?

According to the CDC (2017), “half of the nearly 20 million new STDs reported each year were among young people, between the ages of 15-24” (CDC, 2017, Sexual Risk Behaviors). It can be easy to stay in the now and assume that you will not be included in these numbers, but people are not always honest about their former relationships. They also may exaggerate or downgrade how many people they have slept with . . . no matter how much you think you know them. It may be weird to ask your partner about their previous relationships, but it may just save you from a lifetime of doctors’ visits and medication. Pregnancy used to be the main concern when it came to hookups, especially in a world where contraception is so heavily pushed to the public; however, STDs are slowly taking the lead for the worst con of unprotected sex.

While casual relationships may seem, exciting there are many health risks associated with ‘hooking up’. If you or someone you know are interested in learning more or simply needed our services give us a call for a confidential appointment. It’s never too late to be informed or ask questions about your body. You are in control of your choices, take charge and learn to educate yourself no matter how hard it may be.

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Reference

Adolescent and School Health. (2017, August 04). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/sexualbehaviors/

 

Is smoking Safe During Pregnancy?

Recently, we have had a lot of questions at our center about smoking during pregnancy – “Is it safe?” “Should I stop?”

The short answer about smoking during pregnancy would be “No” it is not safe. According to the CDC (2017) women who smoke during pregnancy are at increased risk for pregnancy complications, including miscarriage, stillbirth, and even ectopic pregnancies (CDC, 2017). This is just to name a few of the complications provided by the CDC (2017).

 Smoking (no matter the substance) will affect mother and baby differently depending on the health history of the mom. Marijuana use is on the rise in many states today and with all the publicity it may be an easy choice to choose marijuana over cigarettes; however, according to the CDC marijuana use during pregnancy can be harmful to your baby’s health. “The chemicals in marijuana (in particular, tetrahydrocannabinol or THC) pass through your system to your baby and can negatively affect your baby’s development” (CDC, 2017, pdf). Each side effect (whether cigarettes or marijuana) will not affect everyone, but it could affect you or someone you know if you are currently smoking while pregnant. The CDC offers hope that if you decide to quit smoking that your chances of health complications are greatly reduced (CDC, 2017).

If you find yourself thinking that smoking is not for you, talk to your doctor about the best way to quit smoking. Quitting cold turkey may not be an option right now but a game plan to protect your health is worth considering. If you are not under a doctor’s care or simply would like to speak with one of our nurses, please feel free to call us [760.945.4673]. We will work with you to set up a time for you to meet with a nurse.

*All information provided in this article can be found on the CDC Website and was approved by our Nurse Rebecca.

References

Center for Disease Control. (2017). Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/effects_cig_smoking/index.htm

Center for Disease Control. (2017). What You Need To Know About Marijuana Use During Pregnancy? Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/marijuana/pdf/marijuana-pregnancy-508.pdf

 

Intimate Partner Violence

Definition: Intimate Partner Violence [IPV]

“includes physical violence, sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression (including coercive tactics,) and control of reproductive or sexual health by a current or former intimate partner” (CDC, 2010-2012, p.117). This can include anyone current or past that you have had sexual relations.

Intimate partner violence might seem like a distant thought if you are in a loving and respectful relationship; however, what if your relationship or someone you love suddenly find themselves in an abusive relationship? How would you respond? Would you blame yourself for not being informed of the signs of violence? Today, you have chosen to read this blog for reasons only you know but reading it could save a life. Knowledge is power and even if you never have to deal with IPV it’s important to be informed.

IPV, according to the CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (2010-2012),  is estimated to have affected 44,981,000 women during their lifetime (CDC, 2010-2012). If your thinking this number is high, imagine if we combined decades of research from reported incidents of IPV. Intimate partner violence is a tragic epidemic that is affecting not only women, but men, youth, and even children in certain instances. IPV can have lifelong impacts on each person involved including but not limited to anxiety, depression, PTSD, homelessness, unintended pregnancy, substance abuse, high-risk sexual behavior, and or chronic pain syndromes (CDC, 2017). The aftermath of IPV can be hard to live with but it’s important that those who experience this trauma understand that they are not to blame for the actions of others. They are still worthy of love and respect. They should be encouraged to find their new identity outside of the abuse they experienced. Intimate partner violence can be prevented by educating yourself on the signs and symptoms of this abuse. Promoting positive healthy relationships is becoming more prominent as the years’ progress, but many women do not have access to the information that is being shared in America. Certain cultures, all over the world, have their own ideas about abuse and the rights of an individual. Think about how many people you see in a day. Are you providing a positive example of what a healthy relationship looks like or are you promoting IPV? Even a negative comment can turn someone off to your relationship, even if it’s behavior you and your partner engage in frequently. Encouraging one another and complimenting the positive attributes your partner is a great way to start leading others. This small step could change your relationship in ways you never imagined.

If you or someone you know is interested in more information on IPV or healthy relationships give us a call today 760-945-4673. If you or someone you know is suffering from abuse consider calling the National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-7233.

References

CDC. ( 2010-2012) Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-StateReportBook.pdf

CDC. (2017). Intimate Partner Violence: Consequences. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/consequences.html